Aj Chand

Aj Chand

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What's next for property?

Posted by Aj Chand on Jun 24, 2020 2:20:02 PM

It is good news for tenants but a disaster for landlords!

With Jobseeker, Jobkeeper and Mortgage holiday expiring, the property market will yield unprecedented numbers on vacancy and solvencies.

Coronavirus has driven a mass exodus of renters from Sydney’s pricey inner city suburbs.

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Topics: Property Management, Property Technology

5 RBA Cash Rate Scenarios

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 20, 2019 8:39:00 AM

Via Martin North today:

 

We have updated our scenarios to take account of a range of new data, and the latest input from our household surveys. A peak to trough fall of 20-30% over 2-3 years remains our base case, but with risks to the downside. On the other hand the RBA’s base case gets only a 1% probability now.

The factors we have taken into account include:

1.     Lower inflation and growth rates ahead according to the RBA

2.     Fed future rate hikes on hold

3.     Potential for more QE (Euro Zone, Japan, others)

4.     Recent home price falls in Australia driven by weaker credit impulse

5.     Underemployment still a significant issue and wages flat

Business As Usual: RBA driven scenario

Things Can Only Get Better: Economy is weaker, as wages continue to grow only slowly, costs rise, and RBA cuts later in the year. Some Government tax stimulation either before or after the election, or both. Some easing of credit rules so lending growth accelerates.

Not Yet Doomsday: A locally driven downturn, as wages are flat, despite some mortgage rate repricing. RBA cuts significantly. Employment rises, and one Bank requires assistance. Fiscal stimulus does not have significant impact as household consumption falls.

Ireland 2.0: International crisis overlaid on scenario 2, with QE and lower rates, in response. May be from Europe (Brexit), China, or US, or some combination as global growth falls. In response cash rate is cut hard to zero bounds, QE in Australia commences, and banks are rescued/restructured via bail in and bail out.

Iceland 2.0: As above, but no bank rescues, so banks fail. RBA moves to negative interest rates (see Japan).

We discussed these scenarios during our live stream Q&A event last night. Here is the edited version of the event:

 

I could quibble with some of those macroeconomic forecasts but on the whole the scenarios are reasonable enough. I agree we are on the path to scenario three. Good job Mr North.

As for the lunatic RBA and its preposterous outlook, no words can capture how bad its analysis from yesterday’s minutes is:

Members noted that some of the dynamics in housing prices could be explained by the fact that the supply of housing does not respond quickly to changes in demand. In particular, the run-up in housing prices had occurred during a period when housing supply had not picked up sufficiently to match higher demand from more rapid population growth. Over time, higher housing prices had eventually led to a sizeable increase in supply, but this had taken longer than in previous cycles. Another factor weighing on prices was a noticeable decline in demand from foreign buyers in recent years, which had also been apparent in housing markets in some other economies.”

What ridiculous partial analysis, completely ignoring that it was the RBA itself that cut the cash rate 275bps between 2012-2016 while also trashing the macroprudential regulatory response to slow lending on interest only loans and to investors.

Of course it did so because it was scrambling to cover its arse after the Bank mistook a two year mining investment spike for thirty year boom.

History will remember the Stevens and Lowe RBAs as monetary dills without equal.original article found here.

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Topics: Properties

Best places to find the Super Moon

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 19, 2019 8:45:00 AM

What is a supermoon?

The moon’s orbit isn’t perfectly circular, so several times a year – mostly at the end or beginning of the year – the moon comes closer to Earth and produces a supermoon, Adam Joyce, senior scientific officer at Macquarie University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, told Yahoo7 News.

“The moon is going to be in its closest approach to the Earth, that’s why it does look bigger and brighter,” Mr Joyce said.

“It will probably be pretty similar to the 2016 supermoon… It will be pretty spectacular.”

When the moon is at its closest point to our planet, it will be about 356,800 kilometres away from Earth.

 

Best times to watch in each capital city

The moon is set to reach its fullest phase at 2:53am [AEST] on Wednesday morning, but experts believe the best time to observe the event is at ‘moonrise’ – when the moon is rising up from the horizon.

“The times that you really want to see it is when it’s on the horizon. Otherwise another spectacular time to see it would be when it’s highest in the sky,” My Joyce said.

And while each city will have slightly different moonrise times, one thing that can ruin a viewing is cloud cover.

In Sydney, the moon will rise at 7:39pm (local time). But if you were planning to head outside and have a look, you might be out of luck. Heavy cloud cover is expected to loom over the city throughout the night.

For Melbourne residents, the supermoon will rise at 8:11pm, but cloud cover will again hinder the view.

In Adelaide and Perth, residents can also expect the moon to rise at 8:11pm. Both cities will have magnificent views with barely any cloud cover.

In Brisbane, those wanting to catch a glimpse of the event should head outside at 6:21pm. The city is predicted to have a cloud-free night – perfect for those wanting to get a clear photo of the moon.

For Darwin residents, the moon will show at 7:04pm, but just like Sydney and Melbourne, heavy cloud cover could block the magnificent sight from being seen.

In Hobart, the moon will make an appearance at 8:12, but unfortunately there will be plenty of clouds about at the same time. If you’re prepared for a late night however, the clouds are expected to clear between 10pm and 2am.

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Topics: Properties

Recession win or lose

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 14, 2019 9:33:00 AM

 

“The time to buy is when there is blood on the streets” – Baron Rothschild

In every game there is a crowned winner and a loser, while one man is on top of the world the other is laying flat on his back. This rule applies to boxing, football, business, investing and so on, a vast majority of people freak out completely when they hear the word recession. The true outliers of society however put on their best bib and prepare for a feast that could secure their future and the generations to come.

It’s no big secret that the Australian property market is heading south, which means the economy which is overly leveraged on property is an unnoticed shadow by most at this point of time. This last quarter we have seen a bigger drop than ever before, matter of fact the last 3 months is almost equivalent to the 9 months prior. Take a look at the CoreLogic chart below.

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Topics: Properties

Value of Sydney and Melbourne properties tipped to fall dramatically

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 14, 2019 9:31:00 AM

These were the worst-performing suburbs across each state (suburb/percentage price decline):

 

NSW

Church Point houses / -25.3 per cent (2105)

Mangerton units / -43.9 per cent (2500)

Victoria

St Kilda houses / -28.7 per cent (3182)

Aberfeldie units / -35.8 per cent (3040)

Queensland

Sunset houses / -27.9 per cent (4825)

Beachmere units / -49.8 per cent (4510)

Western Australia

Kambalda West houses / -35.9 per cent (6442)

West Busselton units / -31.6 per cent (6280)

South Australia

Port Macdonnell houses / -22.8 per cent (5291)

Allenby Gardens units / -28.7 per cent (5509)

Tasmania

Shorewell Park houses / -26.9 per cent (7320)

East Launceston units / -14.2 per cent (7250)

Northern Territory

Bakewell houses / -19.8 per cent (832)

Nightcliff units / -32.2 per cent (810)

Australian Capital Territory

Mawson houses / -8.7 per cent (2607)

Phillip units / -26.4 per cent (2606)

Softening market

Across the country, the auction clearance rate rose slightly last week to 55.2 per cent, but this is still down significantly from the same period last year when 66.1 per cent of homes cleared at auction.

And according to finder.com.au analysts, homes across the country are set to plummet in price even further.

 

 

 

2016: Buy now or never, you cannot lose on property. Rent money is dead money.

2019: Housing to drop 50% - what happens next?

 

Above is a great unbiased explainer on the possible future of Australia.

 

 

I am a landlord hitting negative yield, what do I do?

Instarent has you covered! The app boasts a range of useful perks and features, such as the loaded tenancy agreements which are signed electronically between landlord and tenant then stored on the cloud. We have also added in extra features like maintenance services- from the tenant requesting a job to the tradesman selected, there is complete transparency amongst the users. Landlords will no longer be blind sighted, tenants will be heard, and tradesman won’t waste their time quoting jobs that don’t yield a return.

All data that’s put into the app is stored indefinitely on a fully secure server that meets Australian and global security requirements.

Is it safe?

Instarent is hosted by Amazon, integrated with PayPal for payments and meets global security requirements. We pride ourselves on high tech security as our main priority is to keep our users safe and our app simple for everyone to use.

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Topics: Properties

Sydney landlords crushed by falling rents

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 12, 2019 9:36:00 AM

Sydney rental vacancy rate is a whopping 3.3% this is the highest figure we have seen in our beloved rat race city, check out our blog page or our video tutorials to see how Instarent can help you save tens of thousands on your investment property.

 

Domain research analyst, Eliza Owen, has published a report showing that Sydney’s rental vacancy rate is rising at the same time as rents are falling:

The Sydney rental vacancy rate has been trending higher. In January 2019, the rate was 2.8 per cent, up from 1.8 per cent in the previous year.
The January result is down from the previous month (3.5 per cent), because December usually sees a strong seasonal increase in the number of rental listings.
This overall upward trend is good news for tenants, because rising vacancy rates generally indicate that rents will not grow as quickly, and they may even drop.
Higher vacancy rates generally mean the number of vacant rentals is going up. Domain estimates that the total vacancies across Sydney in January 2019 were approximately 17,500. This is 6500 more than were available for rent in January 2018…
The graph shows an inverse relationship between rental vacancies and rent inflation. As the supply of vacant rentals increases, growth in the dollar value of rent declines…
This has already been seen in the latest Domain Rental Report, where Sydney median asking rents for houses fell from $550 per week to $540 per week in the year to December…

SQM’s rival rental vacancies index shows an even sharper rise in Sydney’s vacancy rate:

Whereas CoreLogic’s Quarterly Rental Report showed sharper falls in Sydney rents:

When combined with Sydney’s plummeting dwelling values:

This is more dire news for Sydney’s army of negatively geared landlords, who are facing not only crashing asset values and rising mortgage rates, but also declining income returns as well.

 

Original article found on macrobusiness.com.au

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Topics: Properties

Mortgage stress spreads to one million Aussie households

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 9, 2019 9:38:00 AM

After a boom, comes a bust.

 

According to this study the Australian property market which is an anchor to the economy is due for the greatest nosedive since the beginning of capitalism, yep thats right. The Australian property bubble is the biggest the world has seen since the beginning of time.

Our 10 year bond yield curve inverted last week, which is the red light for recession.

Read the study below and see how your district squares up.

 

For more ideas on what to do in times of economic down turn, view our blog page here.

 

From Martin North, comes data showing that Australian mortgage stress has surged to new record highs, driven by the bubble/bust epicentres of NSW and VIC:

The number of households in severe stress continues to rise. The latest RBA data on household debt to income to September fell a little to 188.6, but still remains highly elevated. The housing debt ratio continues to climb to a new record of 139.6, according to the RBA. This shows that household debt to income is still increasing.
 
This high debt level helps to explain the fact that mortgage stress continues to rise. Across Australia, more than 1,026,106 households are estimated to be now in mortgage stress (last month 1,023,906), another new record. This equates to more than 31% of owner occupied borrowing households.
In addition, more than 25,750 of these are in severe stress (last month 22,000). We estimate that more than 63,000 households risk 30-day default in the next 12 months, up 1,000 from last month. We continue to see the impact of flat wages growth, rising living costs and higher real mortgage rates. Bank losses are likely to rise a little ahead.
Our analysis uses the DFA core market model which combines information from our 52,000 household surveys, public data from the RBA, ABS and APRA; and private data from lenders and aggregators. The data is current to the end of January 2019. We analyse household cash flow based on real incomes, outgoings and mortgage repayments, rather than using an arbitrary 30% of income.
Households are defined as “stressed” when net income (or cash flow) does not cover ongoing costs. They may or may not have access to other available assets, and some have paid ahead, but households in mild stress have little leeway in their cash flows, whereas those in severe stress are unable to meet repayments from current income. In both cases, households manage this deficit by cutting back on spending, putting more on credit cards and seeking to refinance, restructure or sell their home. Those in severe stress are more likely to be seeking hardship assistance and are often forced to sell.
Despite the popular view that household finances are fine, in fact the continued accumulation of larger mortgages compared to income whilst costs are rising and incomes static explains the issues we are now seeing. Housing credit growth is running significantly faster than incomes and inflation, and continued rises in living costs – notably child care, school fees and electricity prices are causing significant pain, this despite some relief at the bowser. Many continue to dip into savings to support their finances.  We are seeing a rise in households seeking help with their finances, including access to debt counsellors and other advice channels. WA is seeing very strong growth in cries for help!
Just a day after the ABC reported that the National Debt Helpline said calls had skyrocketed in Western Australia amid epidemic of financial stress.We note that the T reasurer yesterday announced a review of financial counseling:
While Commissioner Hayne made no recommendation in regard to a review of financial counselling, the Government recognises that it is a vital service used by thousands of Australians every year.
For this reason, we are commencing an immediate review that will focus on the coordination and funding of financial counselling services. It will consider gaps and overlaps in current services and the adequacy of appropriate delivery models for future funding.
Last week John Adams and I highlighted the  possible link between mortgage stress and family violence, as suggested by the police.
Indeed, the fact that significant numbers of households have had their potential borrowing power crimped by lending standards belatedly being tightened, and are therefore mortgage prisoners, is significant. More than 40% of those seeking to refinance are now having difficulty. This is strongly aligned to those who are registering as stressed. These are households urgently trying to reduce their monthly outgoings”.
The next question to consider is which households are being impacted. In fact, negative equity is touching “lots of different segments” of the market for different reasons, but collectively it is an “early warning sign” for what is to come. We discussed this is a recent post “ The Negative Equity Hot Spots”.
Probability of default extends our mortgage stress analysis by overlaying economic indicators such as employment, future wage growth and cpi changes. Our Core Market Model also examines the potential of portfolio risk of loss in basis point and value terms. Losses are likely to be higher among more affluent households, contrary to the popular belief that affluent households are well protected. This is shown in the segment analysis below:
Stress by the numbers.
Regional analysis shows that NSW has 282,165 households in stress (278,959 last month), VIC 278,860 (285,723 last month), QLD 185,493 (180,794 last month) and WA has 139,621 (135,548 last month). The probability of default over the next 12 months rose, with around 11,650 in WA, around 11,600 in QLD, 15,600 in VIC and 16,600 in NSW. The largest financial losses relating to bank write-offs reside in NSW ($1.1 billion) from Owner Occupied borrowers) and VIC ($1.48 billion) from Owner Occupied Borrowers, though losses are likely to be highest in WA at 3.6 basis points, which equates to $1,022 million from Owner Occupied borrowers.

 

Original post found on macrobusiness.com.au the most reputable source of news in Australia.

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Topics: Properties

8 stylish DIY interior design ideas

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 8, 2019 9:41:00 AM

1. ADD PERSONALITY TO A HALL

"Hallways and entrances are often neglected spaces and can feel cold and empty. Laying a runner on the floor will immediately add a warm, welcoming touch. Even in a small space, layering is important – interesting wall treatments such as a fabulous wallpaper and key pieces of furniture such as an elegant, slim console that fits the space perfectly will do wonders," says Greg Natale, interior designer at Greg Natale Design.

Photography by Maree Homer. Interior design by Hare+Klein.

 

2. SPLASH OUT WITH PAINT

"There's no faster route to finding renewed love for your home than a paint project. For instant impact on a hallway staircase, paint the risers in varying shades of one colour, starting darker on the bottom step through to the lightest pastel shade of that colour at the top. You could also consider a similar treatment on the ladder of a child's bunk bed, picking up other shades in the surrounding walls and trims," says Andrea Lucena-Orr, colour planning and communications manager at Dulux.

 

3. LAY A SUMPTUOUS RUG

"If you're looking to define a space and engage the senses, look no further than a stylish rug. Right now, textures are huge – think undyed wools, nettle yarns and the relaxed, organic feel of bamboo silks. Classic designs with a distressed finish in understated shades of blues, silvers and copper are also trending. For a chic and unexpected vibe, lay a vintage rug in a contemporary setting – a tribal rug in a minimalist room, for example. And remember, a quality rug will last for years, so it pays to maintain it. Vacuum without bristles regularly, taking particular care of the fringes, and rotate rugs in high-traffic or sunny spots to even out wear and exposure," says Bob Cadry, managing director at Cadrys.

 

4. PULL THE OTHER ONE

"Black opaque door hardware is one of the biggest trends right now, as is Art Deco-influenced designs in modern finishes such as rose gold, polished nickel and satin-finished brass. It's best to hire a professional to replace your door hardware although most kitchen and cupboard knobs can easily be swapped yourself," says Simone Pittella, managing director at Pittella.

 

5. JAZZ UP THE JOINERY

"The kitchen is one of the easiest rooms to refresh if you're short on time and money. The fastest trick is to simply paint the existing joinery. I love matt blue and green finishes for cabinetry paired with brass hardware. Or, replace the old tiles with ones that are modern and fresh," says Thomas Hamel, interior designer at Thomas Hamel & Associates.

 

6. SWAP OUT YOUR SPLASHBACK

"Changing your splashback to coloured glass adds a nice, clean element and it is easy to maintain as there are no grout lines. My favourites include simple white or smoky-grey glass," says Thomas Hamel

 

7. TURN ON THE TILES

"Replacing dated floor or wall tiles will give your bathroom an immediate lift. Geometric-patterned concrete tiles are a great option for the floor; if you want a more dramatic look, consider running them up one wall as well. If you've already updated your tapware to this season's aged brass or rose gold, echo that luxe finish in your bathroom accessories; think a brass or gold tumbler or soap pump. Finish off with a tray to contain all your bathroom accessories. It's a stylish storage solution and makes cleaning surfaces easier," says Greg Natale.

 

8. AMP UP THE ACCESSORIES

"Updating the tapware and accessories lets you transform your bathroom into a luxurious, spa-like haven without the cost of a full-blown renovation. Current tapware trends range from the sleek and slimline to the geometric, in combinations of different colours and materials in a single design, as seen in Milli Axon's gleaming chrome or rose gold paired with black. Add in plenty of storage to keep clutter to a minimum – the Kado Lure storage seats on castors are a personal favourite – plus scented candles and soft, fluffy towels," says Daniela Santilli, business manager at Reece.

 

Original article from Homes to Love

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Topics: Properties

Melbourne crash accelerates while negative equity looms

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 6, 2019 9:44:00 AM

Assets are not assets when they’re just debt. – Michael Burry (the big short)

The situation in Queensland seems to be worsening by the day, here we have an observation of Mr Satterley - Financial Review. With bank delinquencies on the rise, expect it to be a matter of time before you start seeing some flash sales in the property market. That being said it could be worth waiting for the end of the year before making a decision to buy your first property! Check the video to see if your suburb is in negative equities.

 

Also, check the bottom of the page for information on how you can start saving 100% of property management fees.

 

 

 

Melbourne housing lot prices will “quickly” tumble up to 10 per cent as Uber-driving speculators and foreign investors default on thousands of sales contracts, Financial Review Rich Lister Nigel Satterley has warned.

…”We believe that over the next 30 months 5000 growth-area lots (about 165 lots a month) will return to the market, either by defaults or speculators having to resell their blocks immediately,” Mr Satterley told The Australian Financial Review.

“This will be caused through a number of foreign house and land package sales where the purchasers were unable to obtain Australian bank finance or speculators’ inability to settle.

As I said then:

If it’s only 10% then I’ll hand up my shingle. As the entire market shunts lower, reducing demand for outlying property, we’ll see a more enduring bust than Mr Satterley describes. And that’s before we incorporate any immigration cuts.

Now today, also at the AFR, Mr Satterley returns:

…he said the situation was “much worse then I previously thought”.

“Our research (prepared for the major banks) shows that between 20 and 25 per cent of purchasers are cancelling and losing their deposit. This is up from 5 per cent in December 2017,” Mr Satterley said.

…Mr Satterley said the main reason for the high defaults were speculators not being able to sell-on their contracts via nomination due to falling prices and rising numbers of listings or an inability to get finance. “There’s no finance available for overseas buyers and very hard for local investors,” he said.

As Martin North noted this week, Melbourne sprawling western land market is negative equity ground zero:

 

appendix from By Houses and Holes in Australian Property

 

How do I offset my mortgage thats in a deficit?

 

Instarent has you covered! The app boasts a range of useful perks and features, such as the loaded tenancy agreements which are signed electronically between landlord and tenant then stored on the cloud. We have also added in extra features like maintenance services- from the tenant requesting a job to the tradesman selected, there is complete transparency amongst the users. Landlords will no longer be blind sighted, tenants will be heard, and tradesman won’t waste their time quoting jobs that don’t yield a return.

All data that’s put into the app is stored indefinitely on a fully secure server that meets Australian and global security requirements.

Is it safe?

Instarent is hosted by Amazon, integrated with PayPal for payments and meets global security requirements. We pride ourselves on high tech security as our main priority is to keep our users safe and our app simple for everyone to use.

 

Click here to view our app explainer videos

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Topics: Properties

What is going on with the big 4

Posted by Aj Chand on Feb 5, 2019 9:46:00 AM

Beware of little expenses, a small leak will sink a great ship.

All we seem to be seeing in the news lately is these big black clouds, around the big 4 banks but what does it mean? Here is our summary to what we found most informative with articles for reference.

What happened?

Based on our research we have found the easiest way to summarize is as follows; the royal commission has investigated the big four banks looking into money laundering, fraud & manipulation of numbers to approve loans. Taken from the Sydney Morning Herald below is a breakdown of the accusations.

Westpac: Engaged in unfair conduct in consumer credit and refused to stop.

CBA: Referred to ASIC over the sale of super through branches ad conduct in life insurance.

ANZ: Referred to APRA over the actions towards superannuation customers.

NAB: The board has been criticized for not learning lessons from the past.

Sounds like we could have a major curve-ball thrown at the housing sector right? Wrong, Scott Morrison our current prime minister has not ordered punishment. That’s right, no fines or arrests. Our economy could not afford for the banks to receive fines and raise interest rates or further tighten lending policies at this current time.

 

What happens now?

It is yet to be determined however we believe that nothing will eventuate. We continue with our day and its just another handful of laws that have been introduced to ensure this never happens again. Which ultimately protects us, the consumers.

 

 

Appendix

The big four banks had braced for this day - and the release of Kenneth Hayne's final report from the royal commission into banking he led will leave a big mark on the sector.

Between his recommendations for enforcement in Monday's final report and the interim report released last year, there are now myriad potential prosecutions as well as some far-reaching reform proposals across banking, financial advice, superannuation, home loans and insurance.

So how did the chief executives of the banks respond to their collective public flogging?

Commonwealth Bank of Australia chief executive Matt Comyn said it would take the bank some time to digest the 76 recommendations from the final report and the government's initial response, but the overall message had been received.

"Commissioner Hayne has called out the clear need for change," he said, adding the process had been a valuable one.

"We note that the commissioner has concluded that a number of matters regarding the group’s conduct, including in relation to superannuation, warrant further investigation by relevant regulators and we will cooperate fully with these investigations."

Mr Comyn is likely to face a grilling when the CBA releases its financial results for the first half of the financial year on Wednesday.

The bank is expected to notch up a $4.9 billion profit this week, despite the bank's bottom line bearing the scars of high compliance and compensation costs from the scandals sweeping the sector.

"[The commission] has highlighted failings both in our business and across the wider financial services industry," he said.

"As challenging as the royal commission process has been, CBA will be a better bank as a result."

The report was released on the same day that the corporate regulator lost patience with CBA's progress on setting right failures that saw it charge customers fees without delivering any service.

"There is still much work ahead to earn back trust, but we are determined to restore broad respect and support for the important role that a major financial institution like CBA has to play in our economy and community," he said.

ANZ chief executive Shayne Elliott, who spent some of Monday morning selling The Big Issue outside the bank's headquarters, said the inquiry would change the industry for the better.

“This is a defining moment for both our company and industry," he said.

"It has been a humbling experience for me, our leaders and all our people - we have learnt from this and accepted responsibility for our failings.

Mr Elliott said the bank needed to ensure the failures detailed in the inquiry were not repeated.

“I recognise the size and nature of our compliance and culture challenge. And I am determined we deal with it."

Westpac chief executive Brian Hartzer said the inquiry could be a "turning point" for the industry.

Our focus remains on learning from the mistakes of the past and preventing them from happening again.

Westpac CEO Brian Hartzer

“The royal commission has been a confronting, thorough and important process," he said.

"Our focus remains on learning from the mistakes of the past and preventing them from happening again."

National Australia Bank chairman Ken Henry and chief executive Andrew Thorburn came in for some particularly stinging criticism from Commissioner Hayne in his report.

“Having heard from both the CEO, Mr Thorburn, and the chair, Dr Henry, I am not as confident as I would wish to be that the lessons of the past have been learned,” Commissioner Hayne said.

"Overall, my fear – that there may be a wide gap between the public face NAB seeks to show and what it does in practice – remains."

National Australia Bank released a statement saying it would review the report as well as the government's response and "provide further updates as appropriate".

Appendix written by Mathew Dunckley of the Sydney Morning Herald.
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Topics: Properties

What's next for property?

It is good news for tenants but a disaster for landlords! With Jobseeker, Jobkeeper and Mortgage holiday expiring, the property market will yield unprecedented numbers on vacancy and solvencies. Coronavirus has driven a mass exodus of renters from…

Read more Readmore Arrow

24 June 2020
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Property Management, Property Technology

5 RBA Cash Rate Scenarios

Via Martin North today:   We have updated our scenarios to take account of a range of new data, and the latest input from our household surveys. A peak to trough fall of 20-30% over 2-3 years remains our base case, but with risks to the downside. On the…

Read more Readmore Arrow

20 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

Best places to find the Super Moon

What is a supermoon? The moon’s orbit isn’t perfectly circular, so several times a year – mostly at the end or beginning of the year – the moon comes closer to Earth and produces a supermoon, Adam Joyce, senior scientific officer at Macquarie…

Read more Readmore Arrow

19 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

Recession win or lose

  “The time to buy is when there is blood on the streets” – Baron Rothschild In every game there is a crowned winner and a loser, while one man is on top of the world the other is laying flat on his back. This rule applies to boxing, football, business,…

Read more Readmore Arrow

14 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

Value of Sydney and Melbourne properties tipped to fall dramatically

These were the worst-performing suburbs across each state (suburb/percentage price decline):   NSW Church Point houses / -25.3 per cent (2105) Mangerton units / -43.9 per cent (2500) Victoria St Kilda houses / -28.7 per cent (3182) Aberfeldie units /…

Read more Readmore Arrow

14 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

Sydney landlords crushed by falling rents

Sydney rental vacancy rate is a whopping 3.3% this is the highest figure we have seen in our beloved rat race city, check out our blog page or our video tutorials to see how Instarent can help you save tens of thousands on your investment property.  …

Read more Readmore Arrow

12 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

Mortgage stress spreads to one million Aussie households

After a boom, comes a bust.   According to this study the Australian property market which is an anchor to the economy is due for the greatest nosedive since the beginning of capitalism, yep thats right. The Australian property bubble is the biggest the…

Read more Readmore Arrow

9 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

8 stylish DIY interior design ideas

1. ADD PERSONALITY TO A HALL "Hallways and entrances are often neglected spaces and can feel cold and empty. Laying a runner on the floor will immediately add a warm, welcoming touch. Even in a small space, layering is important – interesting wall…

Read more Readmore Arrow

8 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

Melbourne crash accelerates while negative equity looms

Assets are not assets when they’re just debt. – Michael Burry (the big short) The situation in Queensland seems to be worsening by the day, here we have an observation of Mr Satterley - Financial Review. With bank delinquencies on the rise, expect it to…

Read more Readmore Arrow

6 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties

What is going on with the big 4

Beware of little expenses, a small leak will sink a great ship. All we seem to be seeing in the news lately is these big black clouds, around the big 4 banks but what does it mean? Here is our summary to what we found most informative with articles for…

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5 February 2019
Aj Chand Aj Chand in Properties